Posts by Jessica Vaughn - New York

With ‘Coffee vs. Gangs,’ Kenco helps young Hondurans find opportunity

Honduras is one of the world’s largest coffee growers, but it’s also a very poor country, with almost two-thirds of the population below the poverty line, according to the World Bank. Feeling stuck in an environment that offers little opportunity to get ahead, many young people fall into a life of gangs and crime through intimidation or the promise of status and riches.

Enter Kenco’s recently launched Coffee vs. Gangs program, developed in partnership with JWT London. The coffee brand is sponsoring a yearlong education program for 20 at-risk youth, who will live on a coffee farm and learn the skills required to work in the industry. The effort is detailed on a microsite, coffeevsgangs.com. The program is part of a €200 million “Coffee Made Happy” effort from parent company Mondelēz to make coffee growing around the globe more sustainable by 2020; the company is looking to work with a million small-scale farmers to push a variety of improvements in agricultural and labor practices.

Kenco’s effort illustrates the concept of “shared value,” with the company supporting a good cause while also helping itself by ensuring at least a small supply of well-trained youth. Meanwhile the program helps assure conscientious consumers that, among all the coffee brands claiming sustainability, Kenco is one that’s deserving of their support.

Rosetta Stone targets Millennials with vision of global harmony

At a time when it seems as though the globe is hopelessly bogged down by cultural misunderstanding and disconnects, Rosetta Stone proposes that a key to a happier, more tolerant world may lie in acquiring a new language. The language-tutorial brand is challenging people, especially Millennials, to “create a smaller world” by learning to better communicate in other tongues.

A manifesto spot depicts everyday situations that could be enhanced by connecting through conversation, asking viewers to “imagine the world if everyone learned just one more language.” It would be a world of shared stories and ideas, meals and unlikely conversations. The campaign includes four webisodes detailing the adventures of Millennials exploring new countries, and a social media component offers people a chance to win a subscription to Rosetta Stone by following the brand on Instagram and completing a weekly photo-sharing challenge.

For a brand seeking to connect with the optimistic, globally minded Millennial cohort, positioning Rosetta Stone as a way to help build global harmony rather than as a purely utilitarian tool for navigating foreign cultures is a smart move.

Shell creates energy-generating football pitch in Brazil

Morro da Mineira Project

Roughly 6 percent of Brazilians (more than 11 million people) live in favelas, or shantytowns, which often lack basic services. Many of these residents are among Brazil’s emerging middle class. Brands are starting to see opportunities to improve infrastructure and services in these neighborhoods, an idea we highlighted in one of our 10 Trends for 2011, Creative Urban Renewal.

Recently, JWT London and Shell did just that by installing a first-of-its-kind electricity-generating football/soccer pitch in Rio de Janeiro’s Morro da Mineira favela. Kinetic tiles capture the energy generated by players running on the pitch, and in tandem with solar power, this charges floodlights—allowing youngsters to keep playing safely into the evening.

At a time when CSR and traditional marketing efforts are meshing, Creative Urban Renewal projects present ways for brands to both help communities and position themselves as innovative and original. In this case, Shell is able to illustrate its “Make the Future” initiative, which aims to “inspire a new wave of scientists and engineers to create a smarter, cleaner energy future for our planet.” These projects tend to be sustainable, fun, educational and interactive—key attributes for brands.

Photo Credit: Shell

Pernod Ricard app helps imbibers track alcohol consumption

We’ve written a few posts about how alcohol brands (including Heineken and Martini) encourage responsible drinking by responding to various consumer anxieties. Recently, Pernod Ricard, the parent of brands including Absolut, Jameson and Malibu, launched an app called Wise Drinking that helps people concerned about their ability to drive, estimating users’ blood alcohol concentration. Available in 37 languages, the app takes into account gender, weight, time of the last meal and the type and quantity of alcohol consumed. Wise Drinking also offers advice on how to pace alcohol consumption and a “Get me home” button for one-touch calls to emergency services and selected friends.

Pernod Ricard is also partnering with Alcohoot, a startup selling a $99 breathalyzer that plugs in to mobile headphone jacks and provides a more exact measure of sobriety. The product “has the potential to change behavior,” according to a statement from Pernod head Bryan Fry. Wise Drinking includes integration with Alcohoot’s app.

While promoting safe drinking is a challenge—in this case, Wise Drinking requires potentially inebriated users to remember to input the information each time they have a drink—providing the tools to make more informed choices and encouraging more mindful consumption throughout the night is a move in the right direction.

With Helpouts, Google adds new platform for solving consumer questions

Armed with myriad tutorials and information from across the Web, today’s consumers feel empowered and confident to take on just about any project. But they may still have questions or self-doubt, and should things go completely awry, online tutorials offer no place to turn for quick assistance. Google’s recently launched Helpouts—“Real help from real people in real time”—aims to connect consumers with experts who can teach or troubleshoot via around-the-clock video chats.

Helpouts are available in a wide range of categories including health, fashion and beauty, home and garden, art and music, and cooking. The platform has 1,000 vetted experts so far, some of whom represent brands, among them Weight Watchers, Rosetta Stone and Sephora. Some of these are free, and some have fees, paid in 15-minute or 1-minute increments. Rather than trying to provide one-size-fits-all solutions for consumers, Google is positioning itself as a key player in helping people learn and solve problems.

AnxietyIndex 2013 Global Report

Global AnxietyIndex CoverIn the latest installment of our research around the levels, intensity and drivers of anxiety around the world, we surveyed 6,075 adults aged 18-plus across 27 markets in Western Europe (Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Spain and the U.K.), Eastern Europe (the Czech Republic and Russia), the Middle East and North Africa (Egypt, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia and South Africa), North Asia (China, Hong Kong, Japan and South Korea), South Asia (Australia, India, Indonesia, Singapore and Thailand), North America (Canada and the U.S.) and South America (Argentina, Brazil, Colombia and Mexico). Data was collected from Oct. 1-10, 2012, using SONAR™, JWT’s proprietary online research tool.

Which country is the most anxious? Of the 27 surveyed, Pakistan stands out, with nearly 6 in 10 respondents reporting that they are very anxious. Globally, the cost of living generates the greatest anxiety, specifically driven by concern about the price of everyday essentials like food and gas. Unemployment is also a major driver of anxiety around the world.

Other topline findings include:

  • Anxieties in Western Europe vary considerably. Concerns about the economy and the cost of living are highest in France and Spain, where they are nearly universal among adults. Finland, Germany and the U.K. are significantly less anxious.
  • In Eastern Europe, Czechs are more nervous than Russians about food prices, their government’s budget deficit and corruption. Russians, meanwhile, are among the most worried in the world about the safety of their food supply.
  • In Japan, anxiety is high over the budget deficit and, understandably, natural disasters. South Koreans worry most about gas prices and employment, while anxieties in China and Hong Kong mirror those seen in the rest of the globe.
  • In South Asia, Indonesians are among the most concerned worldwide about corruption, while Indians worry not only about factors that impact them directly (gas prices and their government’s deficit) but also about greater social concerns like global warming.
  • The economy and the current cost of living are the greatest drivers of anxiety in North America, with Americans significantly more worried about the state of the economy than Canadians and others across the globe.

To download the full report, click here. And to see a short video animation with more topline findings, click here.

What’s keeping the world up at night? Anxiety around the globe in 2 minutes

For the latest installment of JWT’s AnxietyIndex, we compared levels of anxiety across 27 markets, as well as the drivers of that anxiety. Using SONAR™, JWT’s proprietary online research tool, we surveyed people in Western Europe (Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, the U.K.), Eastern Europe (the Czech Republic and Russia), the Middle East and Africa (Egypt, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, South Africa), North Asia (China, Hong Kong, Japan, South Korea), South Asia (Australia, India, Indonesia, Singapore, Thailand), North America (Canada and the U.S.) and South America (Brazil, Argentina, Colombia, Mexico).

This animation highlights some of our topline findings. Watch for a report on our findings in the coming weeks.

Tropicana gives a boost to New York’s stressed morning commuters

Tropicana NYC SubwayAnyone who’s ever lived in New York knows just how grinding-down and numbing the subway commute can be. Missed trains and hurried crowds, combined with life’s other frustrations, make for plenty of negative energy during rush hour. Recognizing this, Tropicana offered its Twitter stream for people to vent their morning frustrations as part of its “Worst Morning Ever” campaign. The outdoor component features the tweets with the best (or worst) morning mishaps, displayed around the city’s subway stations. Says one, for example: “Turns out I did check the correct weather, for California.”

The campaign isn’t all snark and gloom. Some of the billboards instruct commuters on how to reverse the negativity, encouraging passersby to help beautify the transit system by smiling. And naturally, Tropicana is positioned as the good part of New York mornings in other posters. The campaign succeeds in addressing consumer stress and anxiety by helping commuters realize they’re not the only ones grumbling on the way to work, helping the weary find some strength in solidarity.

Photo Credit: Jessica Vaughn

With a toast to farmers, Chrysler builds on Americana theme for Super Bowl

Chrysler has been responding to consumer anxiety by playing up tried-and-true American values and the country’s pioneer spirit in its advertising. Last spring we wrote about a campaign that showed everyday Americans overcoming the odds, and Chrysler’s epic “Halftime in America” spot was one of the 2012 Super Bowl’s most popular ads. For this year’s Big Game, a spot for Chrysler’s Ram truck focused on traditional components of the American Dream such as hard work, dedication, family and community building—things that many Americans fear are being replaced by aspirations for fame and fortune, something we outline in our report “American Dream in the Balance.”

The spot quotes from a 1978 speech by radio broadcaster Paul Harvey that celebrated the virtues of the American farmer. “And on the eighth day,” booms Harvey’s voice, “God looked down on his planned paradise and said, ‘I need a caretaker.’ So God made a farmer.” As intimate portraits of present-day farmers appear onscreen, we hear Harvey saying that God needed someone who was resourceful, family oriented and admirable. The spot concludes with a toast “to the farmer in all of us,” reminding Americans that the nation was once a land of farmers. Ram has declared 2013 as “The Year of the Farmer” and outlines how it’s “celebrating … the lifestyle that keep[s] America growing” on a microsite. Its CSR component involves support for the Future Farmers of America.

This spot reminds viewers that the deep-seated values of the American Dream endure, even if many feel the Dream is becoming harder to achieve. The Dream continues to “revolve around a gritty, keep-on-keeping-on spirit,” with characteristics like determination, discipline and self-belief integral to the concept, as we note in our American Dream report.

Dodge promotes Dart purchases via the crowd

With continued economic uncertainty, many shoppers remain hesitant or unable to make big-ticket purchases, especially the un- or underemployed Millennials. In response, some brands have been creating crowdfunded registries for consumers. We wrote about Best Buy’s Pitch In card back in 2010, which we described as “bridal registry meets microfinancing meets layaway”: Friend or family contributions to the card tally up to help customers secure the costlier items on their wish lists.

Now an automaker is embracing this concept. Consumers looking to buy a Dodge Dart—a compact sedan that Chrysler introduced last year—can log onto DodgeDartRegistry.com, customize the features and then seek funding for specific car parts, using social media to promote their cause. As a TV commercial outlines, “Dad sponsors the engine for your birthday. Grandma sponsors the rims for graduation.” Car seekers can ask for enough dough to fund a down payment, the car in full or anything in between. As with a Kickstarter campaign, there’s a time limit: Fundraising can run for a maximum of 90 days. At completion, buyers receive a check, with which they in theory purchase their new Dart. Since the launch earlier this month, around 1,200 people have created registries, but donations have thus far been minimal.

It’s likely the campaign will resonate with Millennials, the target audience here, who firmly believe in the collective ethos—that every bit counts in addressing today’s challenges.