Posts by Karen Wohler - Mexico City

Trident’s ‘Cambia Tu Track’ promotes optimism in Mexico

Trident

In Mexico City, the traffic is awful, and most citizens have little recourse but to suffer and deal with it. Every day, it can take 90 minutes each way to drive to and from work, and using public buses can increase that time to two hours or more. The worst thing is that this situation is considered “normal.” Being stuck in a vehicle for so long has negative health and social effects, and increases levels of stress and frustration. And there are still other stressors at either end of the road: an unproductive work meeting that serves mostly to waste time or a troubled relationship that needs attention.

Knowing this, Trident created #cambiatutrack (Change Your Track), an effort to help people change their mindset not only with the traffic but with all the situations that cause stress or a bad mood. The brand invites people to share via web, Facebook and Twitter how they see the brighter side of life when they are in traffic, and gives a gift to the person with the most creative post on the microsite or social media every week. For example, a recent winner submitted: “When it is Friday and I’m stuck in traffic, I change my track because the taxi driver becomes my psychologist.” While brands are powerless to resolve myriad consumer anxieties, often they can help people laugh at or otherwise take a brighter view of these issues.

Photo Credit: Trident

Government and brand campaigns tackle obesity in Mexico

Obesity is a major public health problem in Mexico and one that creates anxiety for parents, educators, businesses and the government. According to a 2012 survey by the OECD, Mexico ranks second in the world in obesity, at 30 percent of the population; altogether, 70 percent are overweight. Although the topic is not new, at this point it’s generating more conversation than ever.

The government and businesses are both striving to raise awareness of the importance of a healthy and balanced diet and physical fitness. The federal government launched the campaign “Chécate, mídete, muévete” (assess yourself, practice restraint, exercise), which invites people to have a healthy lifestyle by checking their body weight, saying no to unhealthy foods, and taking the time to exercise. Mexico City has its own program to raise awareness of health and wellness.

Coca-Cola has joined this effort by encouraging exercise, not from a serious, formal and medical perspective but inviting people to move for fun, as part of its “Happiness” proposition. In another Coke commercial, part of a campaign that also ran in other markets, the brand makes a connection between the calories of soda and the energy it takes to do all the activities that bring happiness. The ads invite Mexicans to move in a positive way.