Posts by Nicholas Ayala - New York

Outdoor ads improve water, air quality

Outdoor ads are sometimes criticized as a form of visual pollution—obscuring scenic views, cluttering country highways or covering city streets—but some marketers are creating outdoor work that actively fights pollution, from toxic water to contaminated air.

In the Philippines, an 88-foot billboard that promotes Japanese natural cosmetics brand Shokubutsu Hana is made of vetiver grass, which has toxin-absorbing properties. Placed in Manila’s heavily polluted Pasig River, the billboard can cleanse up to 8,000 gallons of water a day. (While not a traditional outdoor ad, a Cannes gold Lion winner in the outdoor category similarly serves as a means to clean water: Produced by the charity Water Is Life, “The Drinkable Book” is a manual covering good sanitation and hygienic practices that also purifies drinking water, thanks to a paper coating that can destroy deadly bacteria.) In Peru, meanwhile, a billboard for engineering university UTEC purifies air up to five blocks away. Situated within the construction site of UTEC’s new campus, the billboard can filter 100,000 cubic meters of air per day.

Each campaign highlights a commitment to quality of life, reflecting positively on the organizations. In UTEC’s case, the university recognizes that growth and development can cause pollution but shows that it has the know-how to help mitigate the negative impact. These practical efforts go beyond raising awareness to providing solutions to real problems, addressing anxieties and improving lives immediately.

Nivea magazine ad helps parents track kids with wearable tech

As discussed in our report “10 Mobile Trends for 2014 and Beyond,” a new crop of wearables allow users to be tracked from afar. And although this type of technology carries privacy implications, it can also allay anxiety around safety for users themselves or their loved ones. For instance, the Guardian Angel, created by JWT Singapore, is a pendant that can discreetly text the wearer’s location to select contacts in the event of an emergency.

In Brazil, Nivea created a lower-tech wearable it calls the “Sun Band” for its sunscreen brand Protégé that lets parents keep tabs on their children at the beach. A magazine ad featured a bracelet that can be popped out and wrapped around a child’s arm; parents then download an app that syncs with the bracelet and lets them set a perimeter. If a child wanders outside the designated area, an alarm notifies the parent immediately. Nivea says the bracelet, made from humidity-resistant paper, can be used more than once.

In some instances, tech that allows wearers to be tracked will be controversial, but this campaign strikes the right balance for parents by being practical, fun and easy. And it reinforces Protégé’s positioning as a brand that cares about safety by giving parents a little extra peace of mind on a day at the beach.

Chobani’s ‘Farmland’ spot highlights use of natural ingredients

As part of its “How Matters” campaign, Greek yogurt maker Chobani aired the new commercial “Farmland” during the Oscars on Sunday night. With a message reminiscent of Chipotle’s animated short “The Scarecrow,” the spot opens on a serene farm, shimmering in the morning sun. However, with each successive shot, the viewer sees an increasingly artificial setting: The crowing rooster is only a recording; labeled test tubes hang from trees; the cows are hollow plastic molds, filled with a white powder by men in lab coats; and the grass is artificial turf. As the camera pans out, a voice-over states, “Most 100-calorie yogurts are made with artificial ingredients and sweeteners. But here at Chobani, we believe 100 percent natural ingredients is all you need.” Then the viewer is taken to lush farmland, brimming with life, as farmers tend to real, living cows and pick fresh fruit. The ad ends with a farmer saying, “A cup of yogurt won’t change the world, but how we make it might.”

Chobani, which claims to be “the only [Greek yogurt] producer with all-natural ingredients,” according to Adweek, addresses the growing anxieties consumers have about how food is produced—primarily if the food is “real” or not. With the dramatized juxtaposition of artificial vs. natural, Chobani reassures consumers that its yogurt is produced responsibly and the way nature intended.

LifeLock allows customers to ‘do their thing’

In the past few months, a number of major data breaches have made the news—most notably the attack on Target, which compromised personal or payment information for more than 100 million customers. And with people increasingly digitizing their most sensitive information, these breaches pose significant risks to their online, personal and financial security.

Last month, with fortuitous timing, identity theft protection company LifeLock launched a new campaign that highlights the benefits of using its services to protect customers’ data. In an upbeat commercial, LifeLock shows a series of people going about their lives, with digital technology at the center of what they do—sending text messages, transferring money, sharing photos, etc. Eventually, LifeLock notifies each person of potentially fraudulent behavior taken under their name, asking if they’ve done such things as opening a credit card account or applying for a mortgage. All the customers have to do is select no, and continue with their days.

A voiceover acknowledges, “The thing is, you live in a digital world, and you’re not turning back. And that’s OK. Shop, post, browse, follow, bank and stream. Knock yourself out. Because while you do your thing, we’ll be here at LifeLock, doing our thing.” In its campaign, LifeLock shies away from presenting a foreboding threat of identity theft, instead choosing to reassure viewers with a positive outlook of protection, letting people live their lives as normal.

Swedish trade union shows that living ‘like a Swede’ is anxiety-free

Sweden’s trade union confederation, TCO, recently launched the offbeat awareness campaign “Like a Swede,” with the aim of educating the Swedish public on the benefits of a strong union presence—for instance, having trade unions and employers’ organizations negotiate enviable “salaries, pension, insurances, annual leave days, parental leave and much more.” To showcase this, a three-and-a-half-minute video follows the fictional Joe Williams, an American in Beverly Hills who works for his wealthy father and has the freedom to live “like a Swede.” Joe lives a stress-free life—receiving six months of paternity leave at 90 percent pay; hiring a celebrity personal trainer (for a few seconds, anyway) with his health care stipend; enjoying six weeks of vacation while thinking of requesting a couple more; and role-playing as a Swedish retiree who lives on his pension in leisure—all “like a Swede.” Serving as the foil is Sami, an overworked friend of Joe’s who pines for the same work-life balance.

Through a conspicuous absence of anxiety in Joe, the novel campaign conveys how good Swedes have it and all that they might take for granted, thanks to trade unions like TCO. Elsewhere, the Samis of the world worry about securing retirement and health care benefits, and finding time off for child care or vacation. By creating this dynamic, the TCO highlights how it helps remove the anxieties with which many others in developed nations are grappling.

With ‘free’ campaign, FirstBank seeks to overcome cynicism

FirstBank Free HappensTwo years ago, we wrote about FirstBank’s “History Lessons” campaign, which cautioned consumers to stick to sound financial decisions, highlighting examples of past investments gone wrong (Holland’s tulip mania in 1637, stock speculation in 1929 and the recent housing bubble). With consumers anxious over being caught in a vulnerable financial position, the ad dissuaded them from “Get rich quick” schemes. Now, the Colorado-based bank wants to “Restore your faith in free.”

A commercial shows a brand new leather couch, flat-screen TV and floor lamp in the middle of a public square, with a large sign declaring “Free.” Footage captures passersby strolling past the items with a fleeting glance, looking around for “the catch” or approaching with extreme skepticism. Some go in for a closer look, but poking and prodding does little to assuage their doubts. The voiceover asks: “Have you ever noticed how skeptical people are of ‘free’? As if the word ‘free’ automatically means something must be wrong. But what if ‘free’ really just meant ‘free’?” The ad closes with FirstBank’s free offerings.

Print ads proclaimed “Free happens” and included giveaways that ranged from free pedicab rides to and from Colorado Rockies home games to 1,500 free meals from a food truck, which posted a sign stating, “There is such a thing as a free lunch.”

It’s easy to be skeptical and cynical today, so FirstBank reminds consumers that if they can turn off their anxiety, not everything is too good to be true.

Photo Credit: FirstBank

From Hyundai to AMC, brands lent a hand to federal employees during US shutdown

Starbucks Come Together

During the 16-day shutdown of the U.S. government, around 800,000 federal employees were furloughed without pay. While some brands referenced the shutdown via social media—expressing shared frustration with citizens or jokingly ensuring consumers that they wouldn’t be shutting down—others made efforts to ease the burden of those out-of-work employees, even if it was little more than a free cup of coffee. For example, AMC offered a free small popcorn to anyone with a valid government or military ID, while Starbucks—which also petitioned Congress to reopen the government—instituted a “pay it forward” offering, giving a free coffee to any customer who bought someone else their favorite drink, as part of its “Come Together” campaign.

When it came to the larger financial difficulties that furloughed employees faced, several companies offered some relief. TD Bank launched TD Cares, which allowed customers to incur checking overdrafts at no cost, request late-fee refunds on Visa card payments and receive mortgage assistance. Citizens Bank made a similar offer to affected customers. Hyundai added a payment deferral plan for federal employees to its Assurance program, and Toyota announced “payment relief options” to those affected, including businesses hurt by the shutdown.

From local retailers to multinationals, a range of companies were flexible enough to recognize that some customers needed a boost—and whether it was a small token or a crucial payment deferral, the effort signaled that the brand could relate to those going through a difficult time through no fault of their own. During such a financially stressful and uncertain event, even the little things can be reassuring.

Photo Credit: Starbucks

Starbucks’ ‘Come Together’ petition strikes a chord

Starbucks has a track record of addressing social and political issues causing consternation among consumers, from its progressive stance on gun control and smoking to supporting and leading job creation initiatives. With Americans anxious about the government shutdown, Starbucks created a petition to Congress—asking it to reopen the government, pay U.S. debts on time to avoid another crisis, and pass a long-term budget deal by the end of the year—and provided it in U.S. stores from Oct. 11–13 for employees or customers to sign. This was accompanied by full-page ads in newspapers such as The New York Times and The Washington Post, and appeared on the NASDAQ MarketSite Tower in Times Square.

Starbucks announced yesterday that the signatures were approaching 2 million as they continued to tally the total. Starbucks’ Facebook post about the petition earned nearly 190,000 likes, and an Instagram video of CEO Howard Schultz signing the petition collected more than 30,000 likes. Today, the company plans to deliver the collected petitions to Congress and President Obama.

Using its scale, Starbucks provided customers with an actionable outlet as they watched the government approach an unprecedented default. The initiative provided strength in numbers for many who were unlikely to take action as a lone voice.

Coca-Cola fights FOMO with ‘Social Robots’

This year marked the 10th anniversary of Coca-Cola’s Summer Love Festival: three days of parties, games, spas and music for Israeli teens—all with unlimited access to Coca-Cola. Of course, not every teenager who’d like to go can attend, setting up those who are absent for a serious case of FOMO: the fear of missing out, and in this case, the uneasy feeling that your peers are having a better time than you are. So Coca-Cola created a solution for a few of those left out: Social Robots, which allowed teens to join the fun virtually.

Controlled by users from their homes, these robots wheeled around the camp, equipped with webcams and microphones that allowed for interaction with festival-goers. Users could watch shows and even participate in competitions. Teens at the festival embraced the novel avatars, dancing and sunbathing with them. The robots also attracted attention from local media outlets.

By addressing FOMO—which is especially strong among social media-immersed teens—with a creative use of robots, Coca-Cola injected some novelty into this year’s festival, boosted engagement among attendees and brought its “Share the happiness” theme to life in yet another way. (Coca-Cola’s “Small World Machines” in India and Pakistan are another recent example.) Meanwhile, robot avatars have interesting potential, allowing brands to bring vicarious enjoyment to far-flung consumers; as part of its “Three Minutes in Italy” promotion, San Pellegrino recently let people take virtual tours of Taormina in Sicily using five remotely controlled robots.

Coca-Cola presents: The Social Robot from Gefen Team on Vimeo.

JWT’s ‘State of Men’ study finds men anxious about body image

Men's Appearance Anxieties

A JWTIntelligence study featured in our latest trend report, “The State of Men,” explores several sources of anxiety for men today. One is physical appearance: Factors including the constant sharing of photos on social media and the hyper-competitiveness of job markets are helping to drive pressure on men to look their best. According to a survey we conducted in the U.S. and the U.K., more than three-quarters of men agree that “These days, there’s more pressure than in the past for men to dress well and be well-groomed” and that men face as much pressure as women to stay in shape/have a good body. Our survey, conducted from April 29-May 2 using SONAR™, JWT’s proprietary online tool, found that men are particularly sensitive about their midsection, whether it’s love handles, a beer belly or an insufficient six-pack. And there’s some evidence that such anxieties are starting early: Boys are becoming more concerned with body image at a younger age, according to a U.S. study published in Pediatrics.

Men are addressing these anxieties by turning to everything from cosmetic procedures to cosmetics. Aside from providing practical solutions, brands can speak to these anxieties by, at minimum, being sensitive to them. Men are seeing ever more highly sculpted male bodies, from Hollywood’s leading men to tongue-in-cheek advertising hunks like the Old Spice spokesmen and Kraft’s Zesty Guy. So marketers can dial down on the intimidation factor with more realistic models and positive messaging that avoids aggravating anxieties. For example, several underwear brands now perceive an “abs fatigue” among male shoppers, The New York Times reported in May. A designer with the 2(x)ist label said the company is shifting toward something “a little less steroid-y” in its images.

Image Credit: “The State of Men”