Tagged 'Brazil'

Shell creates energy-generating football pitch in Brazil

Morro da Mineira Project

Roughly 6 percent of Brazilians (more than 11 million people) live in favelas, or shantytowns, which often lack basic services. Many of these residents are among Brazil’s emerging middle class. Brands are starting to see opportunities to improve infrastructure and services in these neighborhoods, an idea we highlighted in one of our 10 Trends for 2011, Creative Urban Renewal.

Recently, JWT London and Shell did just that by installing a first-of-its-kind electricity-generating football/soccer pitch in Rio de Janeiro’s Morro da Mineira favela. Kinetic tiles capture the energy generated by players running on the pitch, and in tandem with solar power, this charges floodlights—allowing youngsters to keep playing safely into the evening.

At a time when CSR and traditional marketing efforts are meshing, Creative Urban Renewal projects present ways for brands to both help communities and position themselves as innovative and original. In this case, Shell is able to illustrate its “Make the Future” initiative, which aims to “inspire a new wave of scientists and engineers to create a smarter, cleaner energy future for our planet.” These projects tend to be sustainable, fun, educational and interactive—key attributes for brands.

Photo Credit: Shell

PayPal uses World Cup for clean water awareness

PayPal - Neymar

While the big World Cup sponsors are attempting to score big with a large audience in order to boost sales, PayPal is using the mega-event as a cause marketing effort in conjunction with Brazilian soccer star Neymar, bringing awareness to the necessity for clean water in Brazil. A fundraising drive, Competition for Good, is positioned as a contest among football fans around the world, who donate through PayPal on behalf of 32 national teams.

The effort is a partnership between PayPal and Neymar’s nonprofit, Neymar Jr. Project Institute. Proceeds go to Waves for Water, which provides communities with water filters and, in this case, will donate filters in the cities where the matches are taking place. From the semifinal matches on July 8 through the final on July 13, PayPal will also match donations 100 percent. The initiative is a nice way to tie together the sporting event of the year with a CSR campaign while also driving consumers to log into their PayPal accounts.

Photo Credit: PayPal

Nivea magazine ad helps parents track kids with wearable tech

As discussed in our report “10 Mobile Trends for 2014 and Beyond,” a new crop of wearables allow users to be tracked from afar. And although this type of technology carries privacy implications, it can also allay anxiety around safety for users themselves or their loved ones. For instance, the Guardian Angel, created by JWT Singapore, is a pendant that can discreetly text the wearer’s location to select contacts in the event of an emergency.

In Brazil, Nivea created a lower-tech wearable it calls the “Sun Band” for its sunscreen brand Protégé that lets parents keep tabs on their children at the beach. A magazine ad featured a bracelet that can be popped out and wrapped around a child’s arm; parents then download an app that syncs with the bracelet and lets them set a perimeter. If a child wanders outside the designated area, an alarm notifies the parent immediately. Nivea says the bracelet, made from humidity-resistant paper, can be used more than once.

In some instances, tech that allows wearers to be tracked will be controversial, but this campaign strikes the right balance for parents by being practical, fun and easy. And it reinforces Protégé’s positioning as a brand that cares about safety by giving parents a little extra peace of mind on a day at the beach.

Brazil’s ‘citizen consumers’ use digital tools to air grievances, mobilize

Rio Surreal

As prices surge, inflation rises and customer service languishes, Brazil’s consumers are growing increasingly anxious about the cost of living. But while Brazilians have battled many frustrations over the years, for the first time they are turning to the Internet as a platform for airing grievances, commiserating and mobilizing the crowd.

With prices climbing steadily higher ahead of the World Cup, some residents of Rio de Janeiro have set up a Facebook group, Rio $urreal – Não Pague [Don’t Pay], focused on “exposing and boycotting the extortionate prices being charged by bars, restaurants and shops,” as The Guardian reports this week. (“Surreal,” a reference to the craziness of current costs, is a pun on Brazil’s currency, the real.) The page has garnered more than 179,000 likes, and what started in Rio has now expanded to São Paulo, Brasilia and Belém. As we explain in our recent report “The Brazil Opportunity: A Guide for Marketers,” there’s also BoicotaSP, another Facebook outlet where consumers identify businesses or brands they believe are exploitative, with the list serving as a database of places to boycott. And Reclame Aqui (Complain Here) is a website where Brazilians can post complaints about brands, products and customer service.

Brazil’s newly empowered “citizen consumers” are engaged and ready to challenge both government and business, aided by digital tools. As Brazilians take a more active role in shaping their world, they will not only fight perceived offenses committed by marketers but also expect brands to work with them to make things better. Heineken’s Delegates app, for instance, allows users to comment on bars they patronize and suggest ways to improve the experience.

Photo Credit: Rio $urreal

Nescau, Sports Authority show how they help get kids off the couch

As more people “rage against the machine”—that is, come to resent and fear technology, one of our 10 Trends for 2014—they’re increasingly concerned that their kids are spending too much time with tech devices and games and not enough time in the real world. They worry that physical activity is limited to thumb movements. Brands are speaking to this anxiety by showing how they can get kids moving.

A spot by JWT Brazil for Nestlé’s Nescau drink shows that each time a mother leaves the house, her son sits on the couch playing video games until he appears to meld with the furniture. Alarmed, the mother makes him a Nescau drink, which helps to boost energy: The kid runs outside, breaking free of the couch, and joins friends playing soccer.

With a similar sentiment, a U.S. ad for the Sports Authority retail chain encourages people to “give the gift of sport” this holiday season. We see people (mostly youngsters) playing baseball, soccer, volleyball and other sports as the voiceover says: “This does not require an operating system or a username and password. There are no hashtags, no emoticons, and chances are there will not be better versions of these games coming out next year.” Sports Authority tells parents and others to “give something meaningful.”

Over the past few years we’ve seen a range of ads that tap into the ongoing trend to temporarily De-Tech, as we’ve termed it. Watch for more brands to tie this in with an embrace of physical activity, a clear counterbalance to digital-induced inertia.

In São Paulo, Advil soothes pain of daily commute

Brazilian capital São Paulo is infamous for its traffic: Traffic jams on Friday evenings can stretch for many miles. What’s worse, given the Brazilian media’s propensity to focus on dramatic, gory stories, many drivers are bombarded with bad news along the way, only compounding the headache. So for one day, Advil stepped in to help reduce the pain of the commute by lightening drivers’ moods.

The painkiller brand partnered with Metro, one of the city’s largest daily papers, to create a cover that showcased positive stories. The biggest headline announced that the city’s famous and much-loved Ibirapuera Park would be staying open for a full 24 hours. On page 2, an Advil ad asked, “Did you feel like you didn’t have a headache on the first page?”

Several other brands have focused campaigns around upbeat news, including LG and Tropicana, which sponsored a Good News section on The Guardian’s site. And we’ve written about campaigns that have focused on easing anxiety for commuters in New York (also Tropicana) and Bogotá (Coca-Cola). Advil brought these themes together nicely. The brand also addresses The Super Stress Era, one of JWTIntelligence’s 10 Trends for 2013: As stress becomes a more pressing health concern, we’ll see brands and governments ramping up efforts to help prevent and reduce it.