Tagged 'Coca-Cola'

Government and brand campaigns tackle obesity in Mexico

Obesity is a major public health problem in Mexico and one that creates anxiety for parents, educators, businesses and the government. According to a 2012 survey by the OECD, Mexico ranks second in the world in obesity, at 30 percent of the population; altogether, 70 percent are overweight. Although the topic is not new, at this point it’s generating more conversation than ever.

The government and businesses are both striving to raise awareness of the importance of a healthy and balanced diet and physical fitness. The federal government launched the campaign “Chécate, mídete, muévete” (assess yourself, practice restraint, exercise), which invites people to have a healthy lifestyle by checking their body weight, saying no to unhealthy foods, and taking the time to exercise. Mexico City has its own program to raise awareness of health and wellness.

Coca-Cola has joined this effort by encouraging exercise, not from a serious, formal and medical perspective but inviting people to move for fun, as part of its “Happiness” proposition. In another Coke commercial, part of a campaign that also ran in other markets, the brand makes a connection between the calories of soda and the energy it takes to do all the activities that bring happiness. The ads invite Mexicans to move in a positive way.

In São Paulo, Advil soothes pain of daily commute

Brazilian capital São Paulo is infamous for its traffic: Traffic jams on Friday evenings can stretch for many miles. What’s worse, given the Brazilian media’s propensity to focus on dramatic, gory stories, many drivers are bombarded with bad news along the way, only compounding the headache. So for one day, Advil stepped in to help reduce the pain of the commute by lightening drivers’ moods.

The painkiller brand partnered with Metro, one of the city’s largest daily papers, to create a cover that showcased positive stories. The biggest headline announced that the city’s famous and much-loved Ibirapuera Park would be staying open for a full 24 hours. On page 2, an Advil ad asked, “Did you feel like you didn’t have a headache on the first page?”

Several other brands have focused campaigns around upbeat news, including LG and Tropicana, which sponsored a Good News section on The Guardian’s site. And we’ve written about campaigns that have focused on easing anxiety for commuters in New York (also Tropicana) and Bogotá (Coca-Cola). Advil brought these themes together nicely. The brand also addresses The Super Stress Era, one of JWTIntelligence’s 10 Trends for 2013: As stress becomes a more pressing health concern, we’ll see brands and governments ramping up efforts to help prevent and reduce it.

Coca-Cola fights FOMO with ‘Social Robots’

This year marked the 10th anniversary of Coca-Cola’s Summer Love Festival: three days of parties, games, spas and music for Israeli teens—all with unlimited access to Coca-Cola. Of course, not every teenager who’d like to go can attend, setting up those who are absent for a serious case of FOMO: the fear of missing out, and in this case, the uneasy feeling that your peers are having a better time than you are. So Coca-Cola created a solution for a few of those left out: Social Robots, which allowed teens to join the fun virtually.

Controlled by users from their homes, these robots wheeled around the camp, equipped with webcams and microphones that allowed for interaction with festival-goers. Users could watch shows and even participate in competitions. Teens at the festival embraced the novel avatars, dancing and sunbathing with them. The robots also attracted attention from local media outlets.

By addressing FOMO—which is especially strong among social media-immersed teens—with a creative use of robots, Coca-Cola injected some novelty into this year’s festival, boosted engagement among attendees and brought its “Share the happiness” theme to life in yet another way. (Coca-Cola’s “Small World Machines” in India and Pakistan are another recent example.) Meanwhile, robot avatars have interesting potential, allowing brands to bring vicarious enjoyment to far-flung consumers; as part of its “Three Minutes in Italy” promotion, San Pellegrino recently let people take virtual tours of Taormina in Sicily using five remotely controlled robots.

Coca-Cola presents: The Social Robot from Gefen Team on Vimeo.