Tagged 'Collective Consciousnes'

Companies give consumers easy way to help Japan via one-click donations

In the wake of the Great East Japan Earthquake, many companies implemented “one click” donation programs that allow easy/casual contributions online. Clicking a company’s banner or site button prompts a 1 yen donation (12 cents); the mechanism allows one click per day per person, so people who want to make more of an impact are motivated to visit the site daily. Unilever, for example, offers opportunities to support the affected area through clicking, tweeting, and donation matching (Unilever matches users’ donation yen for yen). As of late July, Unilever’s “Small Actions, Big Difference” website has generated 7 million-yen donation in total (2.4 million yen from one-click donations).

Many consumers may feel guilty about not donating more to disaster relief, and the simple, easy click may help assuage that feeling. The mechanism helps people feel they are a small part of a bigger, cumulative effort that can make an impact—an ongoing trend we termed Collective Consciousness. Brands could use this tool to make a social contribution while enhancing their image and recognition in a way that doesn’t feel overly contrived.

クリック募金

高村 実穂 (東京)

東日本大震災後、ネット上のバナーをクリックするだけで募金ができる「クリック募金」を様々な企業が採用している。クリックするとその企業、もしくは協賛している企業が、代わりに1円寄付するというもの。1日1回しかできないため、たくさん募金するためには毎日サイトを訪れる必要がある。ユニリーバはクリック募金だけでなく、ツイッター募金(つぶやくだけで1円募金)やダブルチャリティー(ユーザーからの寄付と同額を同社が上乗せして寄付)も展開 – 「ユニリーバ東日本大震災募金」サイトでは、7月下旬現在で、すでに700万円が集まっている(うち240万円がクリック募金)。

被災地に対する自分の力不足を感じている消費者も、簡単にできるクリック募金によって少しだけ気持ちが楽になり、自分一人の小さな力も皆の力と積み重なる事で大きな力になると感じることができる。ブランドにとっては、社会貢献をしながら認知度も向上することができる方法として、今後も活用できそうだ。