Tagged 'Mexico'

Halls encourages young Mexicans to aspire to dream jobs

Halls

It seems many young Mexicans would enjoy a change of pace at work. According to a survey by job search site Trabajando.com and Universia, 54 percent of young Mexicans feel their workplace has a bad environment, 26 percent feel unsatisfied, and 24 percent feel awkward at work. Targeting workers who are demoralized, Halls launched the campaign “Jobs That Inspire,” encouraging young people to apply for a chance to work in their dream job for a week (fashion photographer, food critic, etc.).

Contestants filled out applications on the Halls Mexico website, selecting their dream job and writing why they deserve it the most. Contestants were encouraged to share a registration code on social media with friends who could help them accrue points. Those with the most points won the opportunity to work their selected dream job. In this way, Halls motivated young Mexicans to address their frustration at work by presenting the opportunity to follow their hearts and re-evaluate their current jobs. “Jobs That Inspire” stemmed from the overarching campaign “Breathe and open up to more,” staying true to the brand’s core message.

Photo Credit: Halls

Trident’s ‘Cambia Tu Track’ promotes optimism in Mexico

Trident

In Mexico City, the traffic is awful, and most citizens have little recourse but to suffer and deal with it. Every day, it can take 90 minutes each way to drive to and from work, and using public buses can increase that time to two hours or more. The worst thing is that this situation is considered “normal.” Being stuck in a vehicle for so long has negative health and social effects, and increases levels of stress and frustration. And there are still other stressors at either end of the road: an unproductive work meeting that serves mostly to waste time or a troubled relationship that needs attention.

Knowing this, Trident created #cambiatutrack (Change Your Track), an effort to help people change their mindset not only with the traffic but with all the situations that cause stress or a bad mood. The brand invites people to share via web, Facebook and Twitter how they see the brighter side of life when they are in traffic, and gives a gift to the person with the most creative post on the microsite or social media every week. For example, a recent winner submitted: “When it is Friday and I’m stuck in traffic, I change my track because the taxi driver becomes my psychologist.” While brands are powerless to resolve myriad consumer anxieties, often they can help people laugh at or otherwise take a brighter view of these issues.

Photo Credit: Trident

Government and brand campaigns tackle obesity in Mexico

Obesity is a major public health problem in Mexico and one that creates anxiety for parents, educators, businesses and the government. According to a 2012 survey by the OECD, Mexico ranks second in the world in obesity, at 30 percent of the population; altogether, 70 percent are overweight. Although the topic is not new, at this point it’s generating more conversation than ever.

The government and businesses are both striving to raise awareness of the importance of a healthy and balanced diet and physical fitness. The federal government launched the campaign “Chécate, mídete, muévete” (assess yourself, practice restraint, exercise), which invites people to have a healthy lifestyle by checking their body weight, saying no to unhealthy foods, and taking the time to exercise. Mexico City has its own program to raise awareness of health and wellness.

Coca-Cola has joined this effort by encouraging exercise, not from a serious, formal and medical perspective but inviting people to move for fun, as part of its “Happiness” proposition. In another Coke commercial, part of a campaign that also ran in other markets, the brand makes a connection between the calories of soda and the energy it takes to do all the activities that bring happiness. The ads invite Mexicans to move in a positive way.

In Mexico, recycling at bus stations earns a discount on public transport

UNAM Foundation

Mexico is said to be the largest consumer of bottled drinks in the world. Its population of 120 million uses an average of five bottles per capita a day, with consumption totaling around 800,000 tons a year, a number that’s growing by 13 percent annually. This massive amount of plastic comprises 30 percent of the country’s municipal solid waste. Meanwhile, with a large proportion of its population under the poverty line, Mexico is also a country with substantial subsidies for public transportation.

So a new partnership between the UNAM Foundation and Heng Plastic Enterprises (which specializes in solid waste recovery and recycling) is both smart and efficient. Recycling machines installed in bus stations accept PET (plastic) bottles and aluminum cans in exchange for points that can be used for public transportation. In the recent past, similar machines have been installed in Beijing and beyond, providing economic incentives for busy commuters to recycle and a new type of transport subsidy that benefits the common good. One problem, perhaps, is that consumers aren’t motivated to reduce their overall use of plastic.

Photo Credit: UNAM Foundation